Chasing the Norm

Australian academic and blogger on politics, international relations, and culture

Australian Foreign Policy: The Key Debates

Australian Foreign Policy: The Key Debates (co-edited with Daniel Baldino & Anthony J. Langlois) Oxford University Press, 2014

AFP CD

 

The emphasis of Australian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates is to expose and examine the core debates and multiple dilemmas that define foreign policy in Australia. Each chapter is made up on an introduction and a debate which encourages critical understanding of the multiple influences on the formulation, implementation and transformation of Australian foreign policy.

This format weighs the pros and cons of various controversial interpretations of major events related to foreign policy in the 21st century. Key bilateral relationships, including China, Indonesia and the US, are investigated and contemporary issues such as human rights, transnational terrorism, international environmental issues, human security and economic globalisation are featured.

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Table of contents

Introduction: A guide to Australian foreign policy
PART 1: ORIGINS AND ORGANISATION OF AUSTRALIAN FOREIGN POLICY
Debate point: Should realism guide Australia’s national interest?
Scott Burchill and Martin Griffiths
2. The Liberal/Labor Tradition
Debate point: Is there a distinct Labor/Liberal tradition in Australian foreign policy and practice?
Josh Frydenberg, Melissa Parke MP and John Langmore
3. Media and the Making of Foreign Policy
Debate point: It is unwise for governments to make foreign policy in response to media-driven agendas
Martin Drum and Peter van Onselen
4. Australian Diplomacy and Multilateralism
Debate point: Multilateralism is the ‘band aid’ of Australian diplomacy
Ian Hall and Andrew O’Neil
5. The Global Economy
Debate point: Does an open, free-market economy make Australia more or less secure in a globalised world?
Tim Doyle, Adela Alfonsi and Peter Robertson
 
PART 2: AUSTRALIA AND ITS REGION
6. Terrorism
Debate point: Is the threat of terrorism exaggerated?
Daniel Baldino and David Martin Jones
7. The US Alliance
Debate point: Australia is, and always has been, a pliant ally—a lapdog—that too readily follows the US
Alison Broinowski and James Curran
8. Chapter 8: ANZUS and the Rise of China
Debate point: Australia should distance itself from the United States in favour of China
Rémy Davison and Shamsul Khan
9. Relations with Indonesia
Debate point: Indonesia remains Australia’s biggest blind spot
Malcolm Cook and Rawdon Dalrymple
10. Australia in the Pacific
Debate point: Australia should be seen as a ‘bully’ or ‘neo-colonialist’ in light of its foreign policy in the Pacific region and its relationships with its regional neighbours
Jonathan Shultz and Joanne Wallis
PART 3: THE FUTURE OF AUSTRALIAN FOREIGN POLICY
11. Defence Spending
Debate point: The world is becoming more hostile and Australia should increase its defence spending
Andrew Carr and Peter Leahy
12. Good International Citizenship
Debate point: Is Australia a good international citizen?
Tim Dunne and Anthony Langlois
13. Australia and Climate Change
Debate point: Is Australia a climate change laggard rather than a climate change leader?
Robyn Eckersley and Matt McDonald
14. Asylum Seekers
Debate point: The debate about asylum seekers proves that Australia is a frightened country
Neil James and William Maley
15. Religion and Foreign Policy
Debate point: Religion should be more prominent in Australia’s foreign policy
David Cappo and Tim Verhoeven
Bibliography
Index